OAF News

Composer Frank Horvat is awarded the Kathleen McMorrow Music Award

Toronto, November 15, 2017- Frank Horvat is the recipient of the inaugural $5,000 Kathleen McMorrow Music Award. The award recognizes the composition and presentation of contemporary classical music by Ontario composers.  This award is in support of Horvat’s new work commissioned by Protection International, a human rights NGO, and inspired by the impactful environmental photo essay by Luke Duggleby entitled For Those Who Died Trying.


(photography by Anita Zvonar)

Born in Ottawa, now residing in Toronto, Frank Horvat is an accomplished multi-genre composer and pianist who has made the tricky musical leap that allows him to pursue a niche of his own. Whether he writes for his band, the concert stage or film/TV, his music is both aggressive and introspective telling deeply personal stories while permitting audiences to ponder their own. He ignores boundaries and isn’t afraid to mix politics with art. His compositions have a driving minimalism and a haunting reflection and are most often based on social injustices or the wondrousness of life, love and longing.

A graduate of the Faculty of Music at the University of Toronto and the Royal Conservatory of Music, Frank is also very active within the field of music education. Along with maintaining a private teaching studio working with piano, theory, and composition students, Frank regularly conducts workshops and master classes, adjudicates festivals, and authors articles on music education. Frank is past President of the Ontario Registered Music Teachers’ Association and Lakeshore Arts. From 1999 to 2011, Frank was a member of the RCM College of Theory Examiners. Frank is currently an Associate Composer at the Canadian Music Centre and member of the Canadian League of Composers.

With a manic drive to create, his discography is continuously growing and his compositions have been premiered on four continents and featured on radio and TV networks internationally. His portfolio of works consists of chamber, pop/rock, electronic, musical theatre, film, and large ensemble pieces.

diskriminatsiya – from Frank Horvat’s latest album, The Current Agenda
with flutists, Christopher Lee and Vincenzo Volpe

Frank was selected by a jury consisting of Patricia Cano (Sudbury), Spy Dénommé-Welch (Hamilton), Yaovi Hoyi (Ottawa), Vandana Vishwas (Mississauga), and Alyssa Wright (Barrie). The jury was enthusiastic and unanimous in their choice of Frank Horvat for the inaugural Kathleen McMorrow Music Award. They said, “Frank’s depth of commitment to social justice is matched by his inspiring compositions. We are moved by the sensitivity and integrity of his work. This passionate and heartfelt music carries an emotional message to the audience.”

The Kathleen McMorrow Music Award was established in 2015. Kathleen McMorrow headed the Music Library at the University of Toronto, Faculty of Music from 1974 to 2013. She established the award to recognize and encourage the composition and presentation of Canadian contemporary classical music. The Ontario Arts Foundation manages the endowment that funds the award. The Ontario Arts Council is responsible for the nomination and adjudication process.

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 For more information, please contact:

Alan Walker
Executive Director, Ontario Arts Foundation
Tel: (416) 969-7413
awalker@arts.on.ca

 Established in 1991, the Ontario Arts Foundation (OAF) is passionately committed to building long-term support for the arts in Ontario. In 2016-2017, the OAF paid over $3.2 million in endowment income and $325,000 in awards and scholarships.

For more than 50 years, the Ontario Arts Council (OAC) has played a vital role in promoting and assisting the development of the arts for the enjoyment and benefit of Ontarians. In 2016-2017 the  OAC funded 1,657 individual artists and 1,098 organizations in 212 communities across Ontario for a total of $50.8 million.

 Ce document existe ègalement en français.

 

Artist Rosalie Favell Receives Paul de Hueck and Norman Walford Career Achievement Award

Toronto, October 19, 2017- Rosalie Favell is the 2017 recipient of the $30,000 Paul de Hueck and Norman Walford Career Achievement Award for Art Photography. The award recognizes outstanding achievement in the field of art photography, and was presented today at OCADU and the Art Gallery of Ontario's conference Entangled Gaze: Indigenous and European Views of Each Other where Favell is a featured speaker.

Rosalie Favell is a photo-based artist, born in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Drawing inspiration from her family history and Métis (Cree/English) heritage, she uses a variety of sources, from family albums to popular culture, to present a complex self-portrait of her experiences as a contemporary aboriginal woman.

Her work has appeared in exhibitions in Canada, the US, Edinburgh, Scotland, Paris, France and Taipei, Taiwan. Numerous institutions have acquired her artwork including: National Gallery of Canada (Ottawa), Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian (Washington, D.C.), and Rockwell Museum of Western Art (Corning, New York). She has received numerous grants, and won prestigious awards such as the Chalmers Arts Fellowship, the Victor Martyn Lynch-Staunten Award and the Karsh Award.

A graduate of Ryerson Polytechnic Institute, Rosalie holds a Master of Fine Arts degree from the University of New Mexico. She is a member of the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts. She has studied and taught extensively at the post-graduate level. She has worked with grassroots organizations in Winnipeg, Inuit educational groups in Ottawa and Nepalese women’s groups in Katmandu. In Ottawa Rosalie has taught at Carleton University, the University of Ottawa and Discovery University.

Favell was selected by a jury comprising Lise Beaudry, photographer (Toronto, ON); Scott Benesiinaabandan, photographer (Montreal, QC), and Michelle Jacques curator (Victoria, BC). The jury was unanimous in their praise of Favell, stating “Rosalie creates compelling and beautiful works of art. She offers counter-stories that write Indigenous peoples into visual culture – perhaps in reaction to their absence in mainstream culture. Rosalie’s strength is evident in her generousity towards her students and community, which has created an important impact on the next generation of artists.”

The Paul de Hueck and Norman Walford Career Achievement Award was established at the Ontario Arts Foundation by the late Norman Walford, former Executive Director of the Ontario Arts Council, and the late Paul de Hueck, former CBC television production manager.  The Ontario Arts Council is responsible for the nomination and selection process. 

Previous award winners include Jeff Wall (2000), Raymonde April (2005), Larry Towell (2011) and Moyra Davey (2015).

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For more information, please contact:

Alan Walker
Executive Director, Ontario Arts Foundation
Tel: (416) 969-7413
awalker@arts.on.ca

 

Established in 1991, the Ontario Arts Foundation (OAF) is passionately committed to building long-term support for the arts in Ontario. In 2016-2017, the OAF paid over $3.2 million in endowment income and $325,000 in awards and scholarships.

For more than 50 years, the Ontario Arts Council (OAC) has played a vital role in promoting and assisting the development of the arts for the enjoyment and benefit of Ontarians. In 2016-2017 the  OAC funded 1,657 individual artists and 1,098 organizations in 212 communities across Ontario for a total of $50.8 million.

 Ce document existe ègalement en français.

 

2017 Elizabeth L. Gordon Art Program Grants Announced

Toronto, October 17, 2017 - The Ontario Arts Foundation and The Gordon Foundation are pleased to announce the 2017 grants from the Elizabeth L. Gordon Art Program:

Acquisition Grants  
Doris McCarthy Gallery, Toronto
$3,391  

Kitchener-Waterloo Art Gallery, Kitchener
$10,000

Thames Art Gallery, Chatham
$4,900

Thunder Bay Art Gallery, Thunder Bay
$2,400


Development Grants

 
Agnes Etherington Art Centre, Kingston
$7,000

Robert McLaughlin Gallery, Oshawa
$7,000

Textile Museum of Canada, Toronto
$7,000

Woodstock Art Gallery, Woodstock
$3,309
 


“Now in its fourth year, the Elizabeth L. Gordon Art Program continues to support art galleries and museums in Ontario by deepening their permanent collections through new acquisitions and projects that develop stronger relationships within their communities,” says Alan Walker, Executive Director of the Ontario Arts Foundation.  “The Program recognizes the importance of providing a resource to support visual art appreciation.”

Acquisition grants are matching grants for private donations raised by public galleries and museums for the acquisition of Canadian works of art for their permanent collection. Development grants support initiatives that increase the public’s knowledge of collecting or a gallery or museum’s permanent collection, and help make a gallery or museum’s permanent collection more accessible to the public.

The grant decisions were made by an Ontario Arts Council jury made up of arts professionals with broad knowledge and experience of public gallery activities in Ontario. The 2017 jury members were Barbara Fischer (Toronto) public gallery director and curator, currently at the Art Museum at the University of Toronto; Heather Campbell (Ottawa) curator, Inuit art consultant, visual artist and administrator at the National Gallery of Canada; and Stuart Reid (Annan) visual curator, former public art gallery director at the Rodman Hall Art Centre and the Tom Thomson Art Gallery.

The Elizabeth L. Gordon Art Program aims to foster a broader appreciation of Canadian visual art and artists by assisting public art galleries and museums in Ontario to grow their permanent collections, and support community engagement between a gallery or museum and its local community.


For information, please contact:
Alan Walker, Executive Director

416-969-7413 | awalker@arts.on.ca

 

Established in 1991, the Ontario Arts Foundation (OAF) is passionately committed to building long-term support for the arts in Ontario. In 2016-2017, the OAF paid out over $3.2 million in endowment income and $325,000 in awards and scholarships.

The Gordon Foundation is a private, philanthropic foundation based in Toronto. The Foundation undertakes research, leadership development and public dialogue so that public policies in Canada reflect a commitment to collaborative stewardship of our freshwater resources and to a people-driven, equitable and evolving North. Over the past quarter century the Gordon Foundation has invested over $27 million in a wide variety of Northern community initiatives and freshwater protection initiatives.

 

About Elizabeth L. Gordon
Elizabeth L. Gordon, a founder of The Gordon Foundation, held a lifelong interest in art, history, and culture. For many years, she volunteered regularly with the Art Gallery of Toronto (now the Art Gallery of Ontario), taking great interest in stimulating Gallery membership. Through The Gordon Foundation, Elizabeth Gordon encouraged emerging art galleries and museums across Ontario by providing grants to enable them to purchase original works of art. To honour her, the Foundation established the Elizabeth L. Gordon Art Program, providing an enduring memory of Mrs. Gordon’s patronage and appreciation of Canadian art.

 Ce document existe ègalement en français.

 

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